Showing posts tagged apps

We Are Living The $0.99 Application Era

I can still remember like it was yesterday, a time where paid applications never would cost less than $10. Today I can get on the App Store or the Play Store and download an fairly powerful app for no more than $3.99, but even at this prices I think twice before buying it. The App Store effect, as I like to call it, made the app consumer not want to pay more than $0.99 for a decent app, even if it’s just $1.99 it might hesitate buying it.

I would comfortably pay more than $3.99 for a extremely well done, powerful and useful app. The problem is that those kind of applications aren’t very common, but they are an expressive number, but I’m not here to talk about the apps that deserve this price tag, this article is about apps that aren’t deserving their price tag.

In my opinion the best way to actually charge for an app is by using the freemium model, that’s why Paper was such a success, you get the app for free and test it, if you like/need more features, in this case tools, you pay for them using in-app purchases, and if you want to unlock all the potential of the app you pay a discounted price for all the tools. This way the user can feel the app before buying it, which makes me hesitate when I need to buy the app without a way of testing it first.

On this model I’ll start with an Android app called Flick Notes, if you’re a heavily SimpleNote user like me you might know this app. It’s an awesome clean and simple app, the problem is that in order to unlock all the (missing) features of the app: Note and notes list widgets, To-Do list style notes, and remove ads, you must pay a extremely expensive CA$4.99 fee. I think this is to much expensive just to get rid of ads, enable to-do lists, and have the widget of the app. I would comfortably pay $1.99 for those features, and I’m sure the developer would earn a lot more money since a lot more people would buy the full version.

Another example of this, now on the desktop side, is a awesome new app for SimpleNote users that have a Mac OS computer, called MetaNota. It’s a free, ad-supported app, but it’s possible to remove it by paying a $9.99 fee, yeah that’s just to remove the ad.

These are just some small examples of what I’m talking about. If you’re a developer that is planing to monetize your app in some way I suggest you to do the freemium way, but don’t forget: We are living the $0.99 era!

Apps I Can’t Live a Day Without (Android Edition)

This is the first article of a series I’ll be doing. Here I’m going to list the apps I can’t live a day without, in the various platforms I use on a daily basis.

I decided to start with iOS, which is the one I like most in the phone category, that’s why I always carry my iPhone with me: Apps. But then I choose to start with Android because in my opnion it’s a more productivity OS, also I’m  writing this article on my Eee Pad Slider using Google Docs.

Let me begin by listing the Android devices I own and use every day:

  • ASUS Eee Pad Slider
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab (the original 7” version)
  • Samsung Galaxy S

I also have a Motorola Milestone (aka OG Droid) which I only use to test the apps I develop for Android. So I think it doesn’t count as one of my daily drivers. Now let’s begin with the app list:

Google Music
The best way to listen to my library whenever I go. It syncs my iTunes library with all my devices using the awesome Google cloud and albums that I like most and want to enjoy don’t matter if I have a internet connection, with a single tap and they get downloaded to my device so can be played offline. With a stuning UI and great features it’s by far the best music player for Android in my opinion. If you don’t want the cloud features you can check out DoubleTwist which a great alternative for people that just want their music on the device.

Gaug.es
In my opinion the best analytics service available. It’s simpler than Google Analytics and everything happens in real-time. The app shows all the information you can have on the desktop version and also lets you have the awesome AirTraffic Live feature that shows you in real-time, on a map, the detailed traffic on your site. Since I love to check out every second how my sites are performing I can’t live without it for a day.

Wunderlist
This is just the best task manager app ever invented. With a set of apps for every platform you can imagine from desktops to mobile devices. I use it to manage all the tasks I have to finish regarding my projects and keep them all synced across my devices. Definetly a must-have app for people that must be productive.

Google Docs
The most important app on my Eee Pad Slider. Everyone knows this app, if doesn’t know at least the service you should know. I use it on a daily basis to write my articles and long texts for work or school. I stoped using any office suite, this includes iWork and Microsoft Office, after switching to Docs last year. Don’t matter where I go I can view and edit any document I want.

Read it Later
I choose it instead of Instapaper because of the official support for Android and iOS. I love this app because I can keep all the articles I want to read offline and synced. Really a must-have for people that like to read a lot of articles on a day.


That’s it, if you have any other app you think is awesome please share on the comments.

I Don’t Want an iPad Running Android

The tablet market went crazy since the launch of the original iPad. A lot of tablets running Android came to the market between 2010 and this year, I bought the original iPad, the original Galaxy Tab and recently I got a ASUS Eee Pad Slider. That’s the main reason I’m writing this. All the 10” tablets that went on the market, running Android, since the original iPad were just mere copies of Apple’s concept, just a big version of the phone, but running a tablet-optimized OS.

The beauty of Android is that it started as a mobile OS project that OEMs and developers could change, improve and was possible to run on any kind of hardware. Android tablets are just like iPads, but without tablet-optimized apps, and most of them aren’t running Ice Cream Sandwich, which is a lot more stable and better than Honeycomb. So what can make a Android tablet differ from an iPad? The answer is hardware.

The only reason why I bought the Eee Pad Slider was the keyboard so I won’t have to carry a tablet and a keyboard dock with it, otherwise I would just buy the keyboard dock for my iPad. So OEMs should rethink about their tablets and start to differentiate on the hardware, that’s the only way to attract people to buy Android tablets instead of iPads.


This article was written on the Eee Pad Slider.

Dartium is a Great Idea For a New Era of WebApps and Games

As you might have heard of Google included a Dart VM on the latest Chrome Tech Preview. As they said on their blog post:

Today’s release of the Chromium + Dart VM integration is another step forward for the open source “batteries included” Dart platform. Our goal is to help you build complex, high performance apps for the modern web

Dart, just like Go, is a great mashup of Javascript and C/C++ which is great for desktop developers that are currently doing apps with C/C++ and want to move to a better and more flexible language for the web. I know that there is this new thing on Chrome called Native Client that let game (and app) developers use native code to build apps/games for the Chrome Web Store, but Dart is different since it’s cross-browser (if compiled into Javascript).

I’m sure that a lot of developers will like Google’s new language to develop games and web applications for Chrome and for other browsers too with Dart compiled into Javascript. I’ll start learning Dart for sure.

Windows Phone #1 Rule

Every time you download an app that you want to try, but you think you’ll never use it anymore, pin to the start screen so you won’t forget about it, and let it rotten in the applications menu.

The iPhone Has a Special Flavor For Sure

I have a lot of mobile devices, including a Galaxy S, a HTC Titan and a iPhone 4, which are my daily drivers. I always carry them with me wherever I’m going, but as soon as I get back to my iPhone I feel a lot better.

For some strange reason iOS has everything I need and want. It looks like I’m a lot more productive while I’m using it. Apple really made it right, just like the Macs and Mac OS X.

PS: This post was made using my iPhone