My Raspberry Pi Post-Mortem

This might be the worst day of this current year. As you might already know yesterday, after 4 months of agony, I finally received my Raspberry Pi. It cheered me up a lot, since in the same day my old Galaxy S bricked. Today the perfect chemical reaction occurred. All the excitement and expectation converted entirely (maybe multiplied) into a strange mix of frustration, sadness, and anger. My Raspberry Pi arrived dead.

After 4 long months of wait, ~20 items on a TODO list, 3 projects, 2 VMs, ~50 tweets, and 3 articles, it all came to a sad end. Today my friend borrowed me his spare USB keyboard so I could turn ON an configure my Raspberry Pi for the first time. While it was booting I had one of the most awesome experiences ever: I’ve watched the original Linux boot, with a logo on the left corner and all those awesome lines blazing through the screen, just like in 2005 when I booted Linux for the first time on my extremely old IBM ThinkPad. After I saw those lines for the first time I decided I wanted to know more about how things were made, Linux got me into programming, and turned me into what I am today. It was a awesome moment to watch those lines again.

The first thing Raspbian did was show me a nice ncurses-based configuration tool. I started configuring it and suddenly “No Signal”. I looked at the Raspberry Pi and the only thing that showed me it was working was the Power LED, all the other LEDs (including the internet ones) turned OFF. I disconnected the power and tried booting it up again. This time it did the same thing, but a lot earlier.

I rushed to my computer to check if it was a known issue and if someone had a fix, many users had similar issues, but not the same, the suggestions were the same: Check the power source voltage and the SD Card. I’ve started by downloading the other distros and flashing them on different cards, without success on the Pi, I was still having the strange issue. Then I decided to get a multimeter to check the voltage of the board, when I checked the board voltage it was great, so it means it wasn’t the power source causing the issue. All I got was to acknowledge that I got a faulty unit.

I inserted the Raspberry Pi back into its case and gently stored it into the drawer were I put all the electronics that stopped working, which currently contains only my first laptop (that ThinkPad with Linux) and my Galaxy S. I care a lot about all my electronics, even after they are “dead”, that’s why I never sold, or trashed any of them, which means I almost have a museum here in my room, with all the devices I ever owned.

I’m curious to know what will be the next thing that will get me as excited as the Raspberry Pi did. Computers, they aren’t fun to play with anymore, and the Raspberry Pi changed this. The mobile world that always excited me, since the day I got my Palm, is no longer that exciting. So what’s next?

I don’t think I’ll be buying another Raspberry Pi, probably not. All the excitement extinguished today.

Updates:

The Raspberry Pi Will Bring Fun To Computers Again

I was browsing the Raspberry Pi forums these days and I came across a very interesting thread titled PC’s Are Boring. I read all the posts until that moment and started reflecting about that statement. The thread starter was completely right about this, PC’s (which I understand for computers that run Windows or Linux, excluding Macs) are really boring, that’s why the mobile industry is so amazing these days, because people stopped changing their computers every 1/2 years and started changing their mobiles.

A lot of the users on the forum were talking about “the old times” of the Commodore and Atari when you felt like you had power over the machine and today you’re just part of a mainstream movement. Also they were talking about how “normal people” are discouraged to program because are afraid they can break the computer (which isn’t true of course, but that’s what the average user thinks) and how the price of the Raspberry Pi could help people to get into Linux or programming. They are completely right, as soon as the Pi comes out a lot of programmers are going to rush to get their hands on one (I am very excited to get my hands on one too) and possibly a lot of people that want to start programming will get it too.

The RPi will make the feeling of having power over the machine come back again. The best example I can give is my own. I’ve never been so excited for a “computer” since the first dual cores came out, I’m thinking about the awesome things that I could do with it like: Making my own Linux-powered tablet (which is completely possible), porting new Linux distros to it, porting other OSes to it and even making my own distro only for the Raspberry Pi.

I’m sure all the geeks are very excited waiting for the release and wondering all they could do as soon as they get their hands on it. Leave a comment below with your opinion or ideas. If you want to keep in touch to the latest news about the board just visit their blog and don’t forget to contribute on the forums.

This is an old article from my old blog that I moved to here

Setting up a VM for Raspberry Pi Development

I’ve found a great source of tutorials for people that want to start using VMs to develop for the Raspberry Pi. It’s called Setting up a VM for Raspberry Pi development using Virtualbox, Scratchbox2 & qemu, and it’s divided in 3 parts:

Thanks very much Russell Davis for your awesome tutorial. If you want to know my opinion about the Raspberry Pi, check out my blog post at Dream In Tech.

Awesome news for the hacking community. This also says that they will release it for orders very soon.

*Excited to get my hands on the Raspberry Pi*