The New Wave of Vaporware

Last week I got a new development device, a Galaxy Nexus, mainly for Android development since I bricked my old Galaxy S. Sooner or later I would try to install my favorite alpha mobile OS: Firefox OS. I really wanted to try Firefox OS because of how they want HTML5 to be the primary (and unique) way to build applications, but since I NEVER run anything on emulators, I was waiting until I had a device that was compatible.

So I went to their docs to get started on how to flash their OS into my Galaxy Nexus. The first thing that I see is that they don’t provide binaries, that’s not good, but I can compile it myself, no big deal. So I started following their Building/Installation entries, installed all the prerequisites, pulled the code from their repo and ran the configure command to prepare the repo. Then I realized it was downloading the Android source code, which is fucking huge and takes an eternity to download, at this point I realized things weren’t going to be good.

For some reason they weren’t using Google’s servers to get Android’s code, but instead the shitty Linaro ones, I was getting a extremely unreliable, 60kb/s download, it was a hell. After 4 hours trying to get all the code it started failing bad and then it wouldn’t download the rest anymore, so I went to their IRC channel hoping to get some help, but couldn’t get much of it, but what was interesting from the conversation in the IRC is that their primary development target isn’t phones, but the shitty emulator.

I can rant about emulator and all that crap for days here, but I prefer not to. So, dear Mozilla, if you want developers to really care about the awesome product that you’re building, you should first give us a fast and easy way to install it on our devices.

If you look closer at all these 5th place mobile OSes (Ubuntu Touch, Firefox OS, and Tizen) you’ll realize one major thing: It looks like they’ll never ship (yeah Tizen, you’re the worst at the time), they just appear to be a bunch of vaporware.

I really love to see all these emerging technologies and have fun with development stuff, but if I can’t install it, I’ll just loose my interest and never look back. I think I’ll never try Firefox OS again, it was a great experiment, but if you focus on crap emulators I won’t support your platform.

Mobile Search Redefined

You should admit, creating something new instead of just copying a successful scheme is extremely difficult. The guys at Everything.Me did the difficult way, instead of just copying the Google style, like Bing did, they went to a completely new, innovative and useful layout. You can easily tell this by how they arranged the results:

I’m not going to talk more awesome features it has because I think you should go and try it out for yourself. Have fun!

To bootstrap or not to bootstrap

jenius:

Since the day Twitter Bootstrap came out, it has been immensely popular. And recently, there have been more and more posts that either go on and on about how great it is, or how over-used it is. Here are two I saw on the front page of hacker news today:

This is just a very small subset of the massive number of popular articles I’ve seen about bootstrap, and they all seem to come from one of two angles: 1) I am not a professional designer, and bootstrap is a lifesaver for me, and 2) I am a professional designer, and it makes me ill that it’s being used so often rather than a real custom designs.

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Awesome update. The only thing I’m waiting to use Instapaper full time is a official Android app, that’s why I use Read it Later Pro on my iOS and Android devices, because it’s the best one with official support for both platforms

instapaper:

The Instapaper “Read Later” bookmarklet is now redesigned as a faster, more compatible full-page overlay that’s easier to see.

The previous little “Saved!” frame had a great run, but its time has passed. Readers are now saving more pages than ever on tablets and phones, and the old bookmarklet…

Dartium is a Great Idea For a New Era of WebApps and Games

As you might have heard of Google included a Dart VM on the latest Chrome Tech Preview. As they said on their blog post:

Today’s release of the Chromium + Dart VM integration is another step forward for the open source “batteries included” Dart platform. Our goal is to help you build complex, high performance apps for the modern web

Dart, just like Go, is a great mashup of Javascript and C/C++ which is great for desktop developers that are currently doing apps with C/C++ and want to move to a better and more flexible language for the web. I know that there is this new thing on Chrome called Native Client that let game (and app) developers use native code to build apps/games for the Chrome Web Store, but Dart is different since it’s cross-browser (if compiled into Javascript).

I’m sure that a lot of developers will like Google’s new language to develop games and web applications for Chrome and for other browsers too with Dart compiled into Javascript. I’ll start learning Dart for sure.